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Submitted by Comments:
Name: Robin Johnson
From: UK
E-mail: Contact
Im looking for some .360 1 3/4" cartridges. Does anyone know where I can get some

Admin reply: I can offer no help on proper cases, in fact I was unfamiliar with the cartridge, and had to look it up in Barnes "Cartridges of the World." After reviewing the case dimensions, it appears to me that a dedicated reloader could easily form brass cases from .30-30 cases. I would be interested in knowing a little about your gun, the use you put it to, and who made the last cartridges you had. Marshall Williams
 
Added: March 27, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: S.Hill
From: N. Illinois
E-mail: Contact
.410 # 8 (the last) this is out of order because I like number 8, better than 7! Also I made a kind of bar d trade on this one. I happened to have had a Win 37 .410 that was nr mt. that I had bought at a rummage sale for $90 ! However I didn't like it. It was heavier than the 311 no matter what the books show and it had a small hairline crack in the butt stock. I had it with me to trade at a gun shop 50 miles away. when I walked in, I saw a scruffy 311 H series stevens and I asked the owner what it was as if I'd never seen one. He said he'd just gotten it in and didn't know what he'd ask. He also played dumb with my Winchester 37 and said he'd have trouble selling it - a big lie- He gave me the Stevens 311 ser. # c3394xx and $50 boot for the Winchester (he hadn't noticed the crack) and really it was no big deal. I quickly signed the papers and headed out the door.That was in 2004 and I haven't added a .410 to my group since then. Now 311's sell for $600 plus and I haven't seen a good deal in 11 years!
For the record, if I didn't have a good .410 and wanted one, I wouldn't hesitate to pay $600 for a solid 311 Stevens! They've been very good to me!! Thanks for reading this....

Admin reply: Aha, Finally you reveal yourself to be a horse trader. (What gun collector isn't?) I tend to agree with you. One would be hard pressed to find a good .410 double for any less. Thanks for regaling us with stories of your collection. Sorry to see the end of the line. Good luck and best wishes on future acquisitions. Marshall Williams
 
Added: March 5, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: S Hill
From: N. Illinois
E-mail: Contact
.410 # 7.....While in my local gun shop I noticed a fairly beaten up
double four ten which happened to be yet another Stevens 311a .
This was an old gun (early 1950s) that evidently had been shot and carried a lot. It did have a walnut stock, along with a screw in the bottom of the fore end which Savage dropped long ago. At best it was in 30 % condition. Also, it had the barrels shortened to 23 inches. It weighed only 4 3/4 pounds. Prices of 311s had increased and I paid $300 for it, despite its poor condition(2005) It shoots reliably but I wouldn't use it beyond 18 yards - it throws a very wide pattern. Still, I think of all the real hunting it has probably seen, back in the days of prolific game, and I imagine it was some boy's or lots of them's pride and joy! It has something to be proud of, rather than the near mint copies that have never been used.

Admin reply: Another interesting Stevens .410. One always wonders about the "whys and wherefores" of a gun that has been so substantially altered, but I would find it a useful little gun in thickets. Also to pack along in a car. I would observe that 26 inch full choke barrels were essentially all one could find on .410 doubles of that era. A cylinder bore is much more useful at very close range. Thanks for sharing.
 
Added: February 28, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: S.Hill
From: No. IL
E-mail: Contact
I will start off with thanking the moderator for the nice comments - THANKS ! .410 # 6 - This is out of order, I traded for it in 1999, where as the earlier pare I got in 2003. I traded a nice Ruger 10 - 22 stainless" even up" for Stevens 311C #A1728** This one was made right after the Govt. required serial numbers. this had a maple stock with impressed checkering.The top of the receiver was squarish with an angle which was so sharp I considered filing it rounder. Fortunately I left it as it was, and the later Stevens guns had it rounded. This one also has been fired very little by the previous owner or me.

Admin reply: Another nice gun, although shows some of the occasional probelms (to me) that I have seen on guns with the name Stevens. All Fox Model B, Stevens, and the occasional Savage .410 doubles were made by Savage and are mechanically identical. The Fox Mod B was the higher grade version with walnut stock, better finish, and could be had with ejectors and a single, non-selective trigger. The Stevens 311s show more of the variations you mention, especially the angular receiver, the non-walnut stock (Better to have maple instead of birch or some other hard wood,) and the trigger guards might be cast, stamped or eventually plastic. Still great little economy .410 doubles at a time when few or none were available.

I am not really the moderator, Phil is, but he has had some serious eye trouble and can't manage the site. I can't either, IT illiterate, but I can comment and appreciate your offerings. Marshall Williams

 
Added: February 24, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Steven Hill
From: N. Illinois
E-mail: Contact
Well, I promised my 8 guns, so here comes #5. This came in a trade along with #4 It is an H series 311 that is in the D range 9682**
It looks unfired and as a result I've never loaded it. I've fired many hundred rounds through it's twin. While # D2048** had a poorly finished and non shaped stock this one has a nice stain and shape. In removing the hardware it is also birch. It's not much fun to have an unfired gun, but this one will remain that way until I die. ;)

Admin reply: Aha! A "safe queen." I admit that I own a couple, but they are not much more fun than owning a stock certificate.
 
Added: February 22, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Steven Hill
From: Dixon IL
E-mail: Contact
Today I'll tell you a little about Savage/Stevens 311 H series double barrel .410 Serial # D 2048xx It has full chokes,26 inch barrels. and birch stocks with impressed checkering on the sides of the buttstock and and all three sides of the forend. It was made after the US gun control act of 1968 which required Ser. # on all guns,regardless of how cheap they were. I was at a gun show and traded a Remington 870 12 gauge with 26" Improved Cylinder choke for the former 410 and another series H 311 with me throwing in $75 boot. Quite a good deal considering that the 410s were going for $300 at the time! The one i'm writing about was in good shape, but had cheap birch with the shape of a square 2 x 4- I mean no shape at all. That summer I reshaped the wood in the standard design and it had a nice shape. I took the old finish off and removed some awful black stain finishing the birch tung oil. It was light in color but the birch actually had a nice grain. For the next 6 years I carried that gun in my truck and shot a fair number of squirrels with it, and 2 c*** pheasants.
I must say that all my shots were at less than 20 yards. Squirrels have thick skin and pheasants are large birds. Also, I only shot pheasants when there was fresh snow on the ground so I could track them if they were wounded. As I've mentioned I hunt in thick cover(prairie grass and hedge rows so distance needs to be short. I used 3" reloads of 13 grains Hercules 2400 and 3/4 oz of 71/2 shot in Winchester cases. Even so I passed up many shots. I still have pheasants on my land but overalll there is very little cover in Northern IL where I live.

Admin reply: Interesting and insightful. I do not mind birch so much as I mind impressed checkering, It offers no better grip than plain wood and the patterns usually are ugly. I have seen little Stevens 311s going for considerably more money in the past few years, so the deal gets better and better. There are no wild pheasants where I live, but I have killed a few on "game preserves" using a load very similar to yours, and they all came down dead. Thanks for sharing. Marshall
 
Added: February 12, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Steven Hill
From: Dixon IL
E-mail: Contact
Don't mean to hijack this site, but I'll go on with my history if no one minds...... next 410 is a Stevens Savage 59a bolt action with a 5 shot tube feed. My 59 has a walnut stock with 3 inches at the front of the fore end painted black which they did with many of their cheaper guns from 1934 until the early 50's. My best hunting friend in high school hunted pheasants with a 59 and although it was a repeater it frequently jammed on repeat shots - I was not impressed. The one I bought in 1995 worked fairly smoothly. I had bought a Mec 600 JR reloading set up which resized the shells and with which I could reload 2 1/2 inch shells for 7 cents each so I shot clay birds extensively. ( I still lived in the country) I also experimented with large buckshot reloading .32 balls 4 in a row in 3 inch shells. For three years I carried the 59 in a gun case stashed behind the seat of my Chevrolet pickup. I didn't hunt with it, but carried it for occasional plinking at cans etc. (one of the pleasures of rural USA living) I will add that I was in my 40s at that time and my reloads were cheap. As a young boy I could not have afforded my profligate popping off of shells. For the next 10 years I shot the 59 200 -300 times per year at inanimate still targets. It's still in good shape and if I could only have one 410, that would be the one. Also reloading the 410 is much more expensive than it was 30 years ago. Finding empty cases is difficult now.

Admin reply: I started with a Mossberg bolt action .410 and learned to shoot skeet with it. And evenrything else until I could afford another shotgun.
 
Added: February 10, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Steven Hill
From: Dixon IL
E-mail: Contact
My next of 8 Stevens 410s was purchased in 1992. It was a Savage 24 B over -under with a .22 LR on top and .410 on the bottom. I paid $130 for it and it was in 99% condition. In fact it was very stiff to open up. It had a very nice walnut stock and shot a very tight 85% pattern at 25 yards with 7 1/2 shot. It was heavier than the double .410 Because it was in such good condition I fired less than 50 rounds combined with it. It shot good groups with all .22 ammunition bet hit about 2 inches to the left. I decided not to adjust the rear sight because you have to drift it with a brass punch and I didn't want to hurt its collector value. This model had a round metal button that you raised or lowered to control which barrel you hoped to fire.

Admin reply: Arguably the world's most useful gun. The button selector on old ones can be a problem. The little detent fails and you can shoot only one barrel. The fix is easy, IF you can find a hammer with the selector on the hammer spur. It is a simple parts swap. Leaves you with a hole where the detent was. I usually covered the hole with a small oval of brass glued over the hole.
 
Added: February 9, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Steven Hill
From: Dixon IL 61021 USA
E-mail: Contact
To sart out, let me say I was born on a corn/hay/angus cattle/ Chester White hog farm in 1951. My dad had a few guns, including an 1897 winchester 12 gauge. He had no use for the .410 and when I was 10 I was given a model 37 winchester single shot in 20 gauge with a "mod" choke. I didn't own a .410 until 1985, when I bought a used Stevens 311 a double barrel. It had 26 inch barrels and 3" chambers. All my 410s are 3 inch since they were made after 1950.My first had a beautiful walnut stock and was made in Chickopee Falls MA. It showed very little use with 98% blue and all original varnish. Both barrels however had slight bulges, maybe 4 mm but they patterned well with # 6, 71/2 and 8 shot. I paid $150 which was a fair price around here.
In the midwest farm areas, the .410 is very popular and sells at a good premium, even though shells are 3 times the price of 12 and 20 gauge. Hope you're not bored by this - more later.

Admin reply: Thanks for your information, it will be interesting to many viewers. Since I am older than dirt, I would point out that when your little double was made, the 2 1/2 inch .410 shells (cartridges) cost noticeably less than 20 gauge shells, and even the three inch shells cost slightly less, so there was a slight economy in a .410, and they were useful for dealing with barnyard pests and for hunting small game, especially rabbits and squirrels.
 
Added: February 7, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Steven Hill
From: Dixon IL 61021 USA
E-mail: Contact
Been watching and reading this site since around 2004 I think. Enjoy it as much asI love my " 8 Stevens .410s " Finally decided it was time to get on board!

Admin reply: Eight sounds like a serious collection. Perhaps you would like to describe them, tell us the chamber lengths, describe their markings, and maybe date them. That could be helpful for other visitors.
 
Added: February 2, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  

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